Olivia Hendrickson

Boxing

  • 20 years old 

  • Elite open division fighter 

  • Olympic Hopeful

I started boxing when I was 11 years old. But before I began boxing, I was diagnosed with congenital scoliosis. At 2 years old the doctors diagnosed me with congenital scoliosis, and told me my vertebrae T9-T11 were fused as one piece. Since I was diagnosed early, I learned to live with the pain. For the first part of my life I got X-rays every 6 months to examine my spine and ensure there was no change. I went through physical therapy, I stretched, I iced, heated, and repeated. 

But at age 11 when I started boxing, we again went to the doctor to ensure I could compete -safely, or as safe as you can in a boxing competition. The doctor reassured my parents that it would not do any further damage to my back, but due to my deformation they said the chances were “I would never be very good”. But I refused to believe it, I had already decided I wanted to box. With or without natural talent I was determined to prove the doctors wrong. I took boxing as far as I could in the small town in Wisconsin I grew up in. Boxing competition for females  is slim to non, especially in the Midwest. At age 18 It became clear I had to take a risk. With my life crammed into a 2002 Chevy prism, my mom and I took my life to the other side of the country. I moved to Phoenix Arizona to chase a coach on the Olympic training team, Andrews Soto.  Instantly I knew I needed this coach. He was talented, intelligent, driven and hard working. From the moment I stepped in the gym, I knew I would do anything I had to in order be a part of his team. 

This was almost a year and a half ago, and I still work hard every day to prove I can train with the best. My dream is to fight in the 2020 Olympics, and I will stop at nothing to get there. 

Due to how much time training takes, I work as much as I can, but the trips get expensive. Specifically I’m looking for help to fund these tournaments so that I can accomplish my goal of getting on the USA boxing team, and then Olympic gold in 2020. 


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